8 April 2011, JellyBean @ 7:06 am

The FBI has upgraded its online public records to provide more than 2,000 digitized documents. They call it ‘The Vault’.

“The new website significantly increases the number of available FBI files, enhances the speed at which the files can be accessed, and contains a robust search capability,” David Hardy, chief of the FBI’s Records Management Division, said in a statement.

“It reflects a strong commitment to build public trust and confidence through greater public access to FBI records.”

The files relate to a vast number of topics, including Al Capone, Marilyn Monroe, Notorious B.I.G. and the 9/11 hijackers.

But the biggest shock for those who like the weird was a document pertaining to Guy Hottel, a special agent in charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, who sent a memo concerning flying saucers to the FBI’s director in March 1950.

“An investigator for the Air Force stated that three so-called flying saucers had been recovered in New Mexico,” according to the memo dated March 22, 1950.

“They were described as being circular in shape with raised centers, approximately 50 feet in diameter. Each one was occupied by three bodies of human shape but only 3 feet tall, dressed in metallic cloth of a very fine texture. Each body was bandaged in a manner similar to the blackout suits used by speed flyers and test pilots.

“According to Mr. [redacted] informant, the saucers were found in New Mexico due to the fact that the Government has a very high-powered radar set-up in that area and it is believed the radar interferes with the controlling mechanism of the saucers. No further evaluation was attempted by SA [redacted] concerning the above.”

Is this proof that there was not one but THREE UFO’s captured? Does it also prove that the US government has the bodies of at least NINE aliens?

CLICK HERE to visit The Vault

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27 August 2010, JellyBean @ 8:00 am

Ralph A. Multer’s blue-collar life collided with the extraterrestrial in Canton many years ago.

A wounded World War II veteran who walked with a limp, Multer exhibited a gruff exterior. He liked to spin stories about his days as a gunner’s mate on a Navy warship, including ones about the Battle of Iwo Jima. Multer worked on cars and rode a motorcycle. His nickname was “Bear,” a reference to his large frame. And on occasion, he enjoyed a few swallows of vodka.

At 22 and married, Multer worked hard to support his wife, driving a truck for the Timken Co.

He wasn’t normally given to far-flung tales of flying saucers and little green men. Until, that is, the summer of 1947.

Multer is said to be Canton’s connection to the most famous UFO story in world history: The alleged crash of an alien spacecraft near Roswell, N.M., in July 1947.

He told loved ones he hauled material from the crashed spaceship to one of the Timken plants in Canton that summer. A Timken furnace could not dent, damage or melt the UFO wreckage. Not even slightly.

An FBI agent made it very clear. Don’t tell anybody about the covert operation. Keep it hush-hush.

That’s a fascinating story. A whopper. Is it true? Can it be verified? Especially when you consider Multer died in 1982. Could a company of Timken’s iconic stature be complicit in perhaps the greatest government cover-up of all time?

Read more: CantonRep

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12 August 2010, JellyBean @ 4:45 pm

Recent discoveries confirm the connection between the esteemed Battelle Memorial Institute and the study of extraterrestrial material. This new information helps to substantiate the astonishing truth: In the late 1940s Battelle was contracted by Wright Patterson Air Force Base to study “memory metal” like the debris that was found at the site of a crashed UFO at Roswell, NM. This was first detailed in a widely-read series of articles appearing last year [in this blog, which you can find in the archives here]:

Roswell Debris Confirmed as ET: Lab Located, Scientists Named Roswell Metal Scientist: The Curious Dr. Cross
The Final Secrets of Roswell’s Memory Metal Revealed
Scientist Admits to Study of Roswell Debris

Some of this information was also related as a concluding chapter in the revised edition of “Witness to Roswell” by authors Tom Carey and Don Schmitt released in 2009.

It is a remarkable but complex story that continues to unfold. In the intervening year, work by a team of individuals has continued to pursue additional leads on the Roswell-Battelle connection. The results are revealed here for the first time. Critics of the Roswell-Battelle premise will be answered and their concerns about previously-published information will be addressed.

Read the whole article: UFO Iconoclast(s)

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13 April 2010, JellyBean @ 6:47 am

With a blog-post title like that, you might think I have given up the hunt, lost my enthusiasm, or taken on a decidedly pessimistic approach to Roswell. I would, however, strongly disagree. Rather, my words are borne out of what I would say is a realistic and practical approach to the Roswell debate – or, perhaps, the Roswell problem is a better term.

And here’s why I am certain that Roswell will never be resolved.

Unless you include whistle-blower documentation such as the MJ12 documents as being evidence in support of what happened – or did not happen – on the Foster Ranch, Lincoln County, New Mexico on the fateful day in early July 1947, the only real data of any significance that we have in-hand comes from the witnesses.

And that’s a good thing; a very good thing. The reason being that without the reports, testimony and recollections of the witnesses, all we would have would be a couple of pages of official documents (such as a 1-page FBI memo and a few other scant items), a handful of press-photographs, and a bunch of newspaper clippings. In other words, whatever happened at Roswell, it is thanks to the witnesses that we know something of significance occurred.

Read the whole article here:

UFO Iconoclasts

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