30 July 2010, JellyBean @ 5:59 pm

Japanese officials have made a six million dollar bid for the 22nd edition of the World Cup (2022) that proposes the actual tournament be broadcast all across the world via real-time holographic technology.

Holographic Soccer Japan Proposes Holographic World Cup 2022 picture

The initiative, known as Universal Fan Fest, will allow some 360 million people from 208 countries to watch a live 3-D feed of the games.

Though it sounds quite far-fetched for the early 21st century, the idea is to simultaneously capture all World Cup action via 200 high-definition cameras placed in a 360-degree circle around the stadium—and then transmit it in real-time to approximately 400 stadiums all across the world.

This means you would potentially be able to watch each match live right from your local, hometown stadium.

Not only is this proposal quite thrilling albeit a tad futuristic, it’s also green in that a portion of the energy required to operate all the required equipment would somehow come from the fans themselves.

The techno-geniuses from Japan say that as excited crowds scream, cheer and stomp their feet, the resultant energy will somehow be collected. There’s also talk of setting up solar arrays to harvest even more power.

According to PCWorld, the director of technology for the bid, Jun Murai, “stated that despite the idea seeming like something out of a science fiction film,” the technology will be up and running as early as 2016! That means they’ll have an additional six years to tweak it for the World Cup games.

Read the whole article: Weird Asia News

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11 April 2009, JellyBean @ 11:09 am

6

In four days you will be scared, very scared!

Upon arrival, our Digital Photographer Craig Weikel had his fresh batteries in his camera fail. He had to immediately change the batteries in his camera so he could begin the tour, and take photos. During the 2005 revisit, we had learned our lesson from our experiences during the 2002 broadcast about batteries draining “supernaturally”, and brought along 20 AA batteries for the camera, and 20 AAA batteries for the digital audio recorders.

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