12 November 2010, JellyBean @ 11:04 am

I do not personally believe this, but thought you would all find it interesting anyway.

We have all heard the conspiracy that the US government faked the moon landings. The primary reason given by conspiracy theorists is that it was done for ‘national pride’ during the cold war. Now is there evidence to suggest that China is doing a similar thing?

China is renowned for faking things. During the Olympics, they faked footage of the firework display. The singer in the opening ceremony was fake too (the real one was hiding backstage). Let alone all the thousands of fake items they produce. When it comes to fakes, nothing can beat the Chinese.

So what happened with their space program?

One of their biggest PR events was the Shenzhou 7 space walk. But according to some bloggers, this was all faked.

Apparently the original footage from CCTV is unedited, showing bubbles, verbal slips, and other evidence that China’s launch into outer space was a fraud. It was filmed in a pool, a neutral buoyancy laboratory.

But even before the launch got off the ground there was controversy. Associated Press discovered complete launch and in-flight coverage provided at Xinhau before liftoff ever happened, including chats between astronauts and ground control. The “in-flight report” disappeared after the AP discovery with officials citing ‘difficulties’.

The live broadcast of the space walk appeared on Thursday when the launch was not till Friday… NORAD says there was NO launch from China till Sunday!

Check it out here:

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Now check out this video on the faking evidence:

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Read more HERE and for another opinion look HERE.

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8 September 2010, JellyBean @ 9:11 am

An interesting argument is playing out in the Space section of MSNBC. It began when veteran space reporter James Oberg questioned the foundation of a new book about UFOs called “UFOs: Generals, Pilots and Government Officials Go on the Record.”

“The book’s main themes are the extraordinary stories of strange aerial encounters in Europe, South America and even the United States,” Oberg writes. “In these stories, investigators have failed to pinpoint phenomena to explain the sightings. And because the primary witnesses are pilots, the accounts are considered more credible than run-of-the-mill UFO reports. But are they really?”

Leslie Kean is the author of the book, and she’s striking back, calling Oberg a longtime UFO skeptic who “may be qualified to serve as an unbiased, expert consultant on Russian or Chinese missile systems, but not on UFOs.” This is a classic UFO battle, not over hard evidence but over claimed sightings. Who can say whether the witnesses actually saw what they think they saw, or if a trick of light or perspective was at work.

Kean is no doubt going to sell a lot of books because of the kerfluffle, and no doubt she’s playing on the “unknown” bigtime. Nonetheless, she contends the conclusion of her book is simply this: “We need a systematic, scientific investigation of the skies that actively looks for these mysterious and elusive objects.”

Kean says skeptics miss the point of the book….

Read more about this epic battle here: LiveScience

Check out the battle in the MSNBC comments here: MSNBC

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1 September 2010, JellyBean @ 11:41 am

Crop circles were revealed as a hoax almost 20 years ago, so why do so many people still flock to Wiltshire, convinced of their extraterrestrial powers?

Wiltshire’s a beautiful county and it’s an idyllic Friday evening at the Barge Inn, Honeystreet. Boats are moored on the canal that runs past the pub, there’s a White Horse etched into the chalk just down the road and in the pub’s back room the ceiling is painted with images of Stonehenge, errant cherubim and crop circles. ‘It is,’ one local tells me, ‘the Sistine Chapel of Wiltshire.’

The Barge indeed is Crop Circle Central – there’s even Croppie ale for sale – and circle aficionados arrive to camp here from all over the world: in the visitors’ book Kerry from Australia has written: ‘Great crop circles! Great people!’, while Miranda and Trond from Norway say: ‘Great to be back at Croppie HQ!’ No wonder an official at the Wiltshire Tourist Board tells me that they love crop circles; together with the numinous delights of Stonehenge and Avebury Rings they’re the county’s biggest draws.

Last year was a bumper year for fantastically elaborate, large crop formations – 70 or so, many within spitting distance of the Barge and one taking three nights to fully emerge – and in early August this year, more than 45 had been reported. And, remarkably, in June the scientific journal, Nature, ran a piece on them.

Read more: Telegraph

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31 August 2010, JellyBean @ 9:30 am

If we trust pilots to carry us through the air safely, and to guard our nation’s skies, then why can’t we trust what they tell us about their encounters with unidentified flying objects?

That’s the question posed by investigative journalist Leslie Kean in her new book, “UFOs: Generals, Pilots and Government Officials Go on the Record.” It’s a compelling question — but is it a good argument for the existence of something truly unexplainable?

The book’s main themes are the extraordinary stories of strange aerial encounters in Europe, South America and even the United States. In these stories, investigators have failed to pinpoint phenomena to explain the sightings. And because the primary witnesses are pilots, the accounts are considered more credible than run-of-the-mill UFO reports. But are they really?

Kean asserts that pilots are the best describers of aerial phenomena. “They represent the world’s best-trained observers of everything that flies,” she writes. “What better source for data on UFOs is there?… [They] are among the least likely of any group of witnesses to fabricate or exaggerate reports of strange sightings.”

This may sound like a plausible assumption, but others who have studied the raw evidence disagree. Experienced UFO investigators realize that pilots, who instinctively and quite properly interpret visual phenomena in the most hazardous terms, are not dispassionate observers. For pilots, a split-second diagnosis can be a matter of life or death — and so they’re inclined to overestimate the potential threats posed by what they see.

Read the full article: MSNBC

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