26 August 2010, JellyBean @ 6:50 am

When Uri Geller saw a rocky lump off Scotland’s eastern coast was for sale a couple of years ago, the famed spoon-bender says he knew he had to have it.

“I didn’t know why. I was somehow drawn to it,” Mr. Geller recalls. He put in a successful £30,000, or about $46,000, offer.

Today, the 63-year-old paranormalist says he now understands why he bought the uninhabited, 100 yard-by-50 yard Lamb Island. Buried inside, he says, is an Egyptian treasure including relics supposedly brought there by a pharaoh’s daughter some 3,500 years ago.

Mr. Geller was once one of the most famous people in the world in the 1970s, regularly appearing on television and baffling audiences with his spoon-bending exploits. He continues to draw a crowd, and his sudden interest in “The Lamb,” as it’s known locally, is raising eyebrows among skeptical Scots.

Tales of Scotland’s ties to ancient Egypt date back to the 15th century, but many regard them as a bit of nonsense. According to the legend, King Tutankhamen’s half-sister, Princess Scota, fell out with her family and fled to Ireland and then Scotland, thereby giving the country its name. Some say the alignment of the Lamb and two nearby islands closely mirrors the layout of the pyramids at Giza, near Cairo, not to mention the three main stars in the Orion’s Belt constellation.

Read more: Wall Street Journal

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