1 August 2010, JellyBean @ 6:05 pm

Many rightly wonder why an ET vehicle with the ability to traverse light years through the cosmos would arrive all the way to Earth – only to crash in New Mexico. How is it that an interplanetary people with such advanced aerial technology could come to such grief on the July-baked desert floor? Why did the Roswell craft fall in the first place? A review and analysis of the 1947 incident reveals a unique “confluence of events” that may well have led to the crash:

THE STORM ELECTRIC

It is said that Mac Brazel had reported hearing a loud explosion during a severe lightning and thunder storm the night before he had discovered the crash debris on the Foster Ranch that he had managed. RAAF Intel Agent Sgt Jesse Marcel reported that the scattered debris had appeared to him to have “exploded” in mid-air before hitting the ground.

Weather records do in fact confirm that there were thunderstorms in late June and early July of 1947 (including on July 2 and July 4) in the Foster Ranch area where some of the crash debris was found. And -as with many areas of the country- in the summertime (particularly in the evenings) such isolated but severe storms can “pop up” without notice in an instant, only to pass as quickly – and often without even being officially recorded.

The action of severe storms on aircraft is still a subject of intense study. Today’s aircraft do tend to disperse and distribute a lightning strike across and throughout the surface and skin of the craft. Electrical and digital flight systems are also insulated and shielded, helping to prevent a crash. Still, there is no doubt that many hundreds of aircraft do indeed fall from the skies around the world every year due to especially adverse weather conditions. “Freak” weather can “freak out” even the most fortified and hardened technologies.

Read the whole article: UFO Iconoclast(s)

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